• Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen

Mara Bush Camp

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  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
  • Mara Bush Camp Impressionen
Migration News

Mara map 10 09 2014

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Handmade Jewelry from the Masai Mara

The "Eclastic" Jewelry arrived now at Mara Bush Camp

Schmuck aus der Masai Mara

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New residents at Mara Bush Camp

New residents at Mara Bush Camp. A dwarf Mangoose family found a new home.

Mangusten im Mara Bush Camp

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Camp News March

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Update 27th of March: News from the bush from Mara Bush Camp

Water is LIFE“ for humans, fauna and flora! The children of the Olare Orok School take a small quantity of water daily in plastic water bottles or containers. The expected long rains have not yet started in the Mara and in the mean time we want to use this time to build and install measures for proper rain collection. From the money received in December as part of our charity kitty, we purchased metal gutters and wire in order to fix the gutter on the roof of the tiny school building. Within 2 days and the help of our maintenance team member Bahati we managed to connect the gutters to 3 large plastic drums (courtesy of Mara Bush Camp) in order to offer a long lasting solution for rain collection and water storage. Both teachers and pupils found the idea great and our work was more than welcome with great appreciation. One of the teachers David Naurori was on site, assisting our Camp technician with the construction work . We managed to fix three plastic tanks, which we used from the camp. We are waiting for the rains to begin! Pupils, teachers and the environment will be relieved for a long time to come.

water_b

Just before the arrival of the first guests on 1st February, our Mara Bush Camp Team had already started preparations a week in advance. A number of things were due for renewal; the generator needed a new shelter. Its original housing was ripe for renovation after several years of good service. The ground on which it was built, was slowly giving way since it was built using pure soil; this is basically in line with our non-permanent status at the camp. The construction was raised with the so-called earth bag method whereby bags are filled with soil to make soundproof walls. Most of our guests are surprised that they hardly hear any noise from the generator, yet it runs every evening for Camp lighting and charging of batteries. You are most welcome to see this unusual construction of our generator house and to have a first hand experience on how it was done. At the same time, a new compost station was constructed in a four-meter pit deep in the ground. Waste from the kitchen is converted into useful manure with the help of biodigestive cultures. The pit is properly sheltered with a well-ventilated cover to keep away the curious Olive baboons from interfering. The manure from the old manure pit comes in handy in revitalizing the recently planted trees making a small bush next to the welcome tent. Part of our environmental responsibility is to take care of the footpaths we use on a daily basis. Our MBC guide Eric and Lenkume worked tirelessly to ensure that the footpaths are well paved before the heavy rains set in. They literally dug, removed the soil and laid stones on the flat paths. This will ensure easy movement for both Safari vehicles and the water tanker during the high season as they roll down the hill to enter the camp. It will also ensure that heavy vehicles leave no permanent marks on the way.

Our February /March season was quite unpredictable in terms of weather; the beginning of February was hot and dry such that the green grass changed to golden yellow and brown due to the intense heat. The sky was beautifully blue in the evenings; the stars provided an incredible atmosphere for dinner and chatting by the campfire. ‘A true African experience’

lion familyAt the end of the month, clouds from different directions started pulling together and within no time, we were blessed with the first drops of rain, turning into heavy downpour at times in the afternoon and at night. The beginning of March provided beautiful sunsets making it possible for us to offer not only exciting but also relaxing sundowners to our clients under the famous banalities trees. No rains have been recorded since the 7th March, which means that we need to take extra care for the seedlings planted recently. They have to be watered every day. Excellent light and beautiful motives is what every serious photographer yearns for, Newborn calves’ spring and hunt in the savannah plains, caring hyena mothers keep an eye on the cubs scuffling while predators relax in the tinning bushes. Butterflies and Baboons enjoy the drying fruits of different trees. The Hippos in the nearby pool of the half island where the Olare Orok River takes a curve, provides entertaining noises in the evening. One big Crocodile ended up at the pool near the camp due to the heavy rains, he seems very much at home. Herds of 10-20 Eland antelopes too can be seen in an area near Mara Bush Camp.

The highlight of our March opening period were the 04 tiny lion cubs. Near the double crossing is a Lioness with 02 cubs, about 3 weeks old. At the confluence of Talek and Olare Orok Rivers is the famous Leopard Olive with 2 her cubs, also 3 weeks old and carefully hidden in a small hole, protected by a huge rock to keep them safe from eager visitors.

A glance of the Migration season this year
We have a few final touches to sort out before we open for the high season. Top on the priority list is the improvement of the electric energy produced by the Solar panel. We intend to improve the lighting system in the tents and introduce big batteries with more energy. This will guarantee more comfort and a reliable source of energy. We want to guarantee enough light throughout, Kerosene lamps along the footpaths and the grass will be replaced with bulbs powered by the solar energy, no more smell of Kerosene and it is environmentally friendlier to use solar power. These changes will not affect the usual atmosphere. How do we intend to achieve this?  Let this be a surprise!

The extra activities offered at Mara Bush Camp will also have something new ! A School visit to our little Maasai Olrare Orok primary School!
Our Charity project, the small Olare Orok primary school is 30-minutes drive from the Mara Bush Camp. Whoever is interested in finding out the daily activities of a village school in Kenya, and what the pupils learn is most welcome to experience this first hand. The school visit can be combined with the usual game drives. Maybe you could bring with you a map / pictures / post cards of your home country to show the children where you are coming from ? Alternatively, you cold play football with them. If you would like to support this project we have assorted educational packs for sale at Mara Bush Camp which you can purchase at cost price of KSHS 600/- per pack. The amount collected from the sales is put in a separate account, this will be used in supporting the school committees projects, such as further training of the teachers and in improving the facilities in the school itself.

If you would like to contribute towards improving the environment of the school, you are free to pick a seedling from the Mara Bush Camp tree nursery and plant it on the school’s compound. A small note bearing your name will be attached to the tree as remembrance of your contribution. The pupils will take over the tending of the trees thereafter. This way, you will leave a permanent mark in Africa and at the same time improve the environment.

Nicholus, Sabine and the Mara Bush Camp Team

 

News from the bush from Mara Bush Camp

masai_mara_march

We have been receiving rains in the Mara for the last couple of days and our maintenance personnel took the initiative to plant trees next to the welcome tent. The area was once used for parking and it was bare, but now it will be a forest again - thanks to Bahati. Mainly he has planted the orange leafed croton, which the scent keeps away flies and mosquitoes.

For this reason, it’s common to see lions sleeping under these bushes in the Mara as the flies are kept at bay…

Keep ‘watching’ this space for more news from Mara Bush Camp…

 

Nicholus, Sabine and the Mara Bush Camp Team